The Son separated from the Mother, returns


Update for week ended 9 Sep 2011

When a child gets separated from a mother, it gets quite traumatic – for the child as well as the mother. And many mothers (including those who are reading this) have experienced this at some point of time in their lives – starting with the first moments when the mother goes to work leaving her infant at home with the nanny or the granny; or in some cases when the child goes to the its prep school or playgroup. These moments at times can be poignant though the mother and child (at times) know that the separation would last more than a couple of hours. But the tears are shed, the throats turned hoarse with the bawling, and higher BP levels. So imagine what a mother would do if her child were to be separated from her for days on end… at times just a day and a half; or five or seven or even ten or eleven at times. The child and mother separation can be traumatic, right. That is why some communities invite the mother over to their place to host the child along with her; while others first get the child home and then bring the mother within 5 days (to appease her and the child) ; however the bolder and more boisterous of the lot hold on the child for ten days and then very ceremoniously lead the child to its mother. One such mother is Parvati – the daughter of the great mountain-like Parvata who married the wild and temperamental Lord who also lived in the mountains with his hordes of followers – Shiva. Longing for a child, she decided to model one from her skin and body and some celestial clay. And a strapping young lad was created who was so devoted to his mother that he even stopped his father from entering her private chambers, earning him the ill-famous wrath of Shiva by way of a severed head. Of course, this was remedied as the weeping mother ordered her husband to get her son’s life back and he did with the help of his trusted servant, the strong bull-like Nandi, who used the head of a just dead elephant on the body of the child and hence was reborn – Gajanan…. The elephant headed boy. This little boy was very intelligent, smart, a good learner, diligent and despite his pudginess, he was quite adept at removing hurdles from the paths of those who he lived with. Knowing this, the denizens of Prithviloka have been inviting him home each year. Many of them have also tried to imitate his mother, but moulding clay models of his likeness and then entertaining and feeding him through his stay. But as children get anxious for their mothers, so does Gajanan or Ganesha…. And the Prithviloka hosts know that – so they keep him back with tantalizing food, earful music and 24 hour vigilance. But when the time to take him back to his mother’s abode, they take the journey that leads the along the streets of their villages, towns or cities to the nearest waterbody and then bid a final farewell at the banks or shores before letting him slip into the water with his water friends, who will help him get back to his mother as they are part of her Nature Team.

The Ganesh Festival week is concluding – and D Boyz on D Street have also been trying to keep their Ganesh amused and entertained, by the pyrotechnics of the lightning-like SENSEX. So some days it dips low low that it glows bright red and on others it is waved upwards towards the leafy trees of the Street and it burns a soothing green. And on the last day – when Ganesh has to be bid his farewell – the fires are lit that burn the SENSEX red and point downwards – as though symbolizing that ganesha will have to meet to his sea friends deep in the sea…. So with all that movement, the SENSEX did not move much – it stayed with the Boyz close to Sea (Street) Level – at 16867 – just 46 points up from the previous week.

I happen to live near the sea shore, and I got some pictures from the sea which are self explanatory – as you see the sea friends of Ganesha with him in a moment of happy meeting before they all go together to his mother’s place.

The rippling blue waves, the tortoise and the bluefish with starfish…. They all awaited Ganesha’s arrival in the blue sea.

Wishing you all a very happy Onam and happy Ganesh festival…. Enjoy your weekend and be safe… Cheers.

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2 thoughts on “The Son separated from the Mother, returns

  1. That could be the reason why in Karnataka the festival is celebrated as Gowri Ganesha. Gowri Pooja is celebrated the day before Ganesh Pooja, thus inviting the mother before the son arrives.

    Best wishes

    1. That is correct. Karnataka tradition has Gowri Ganesh, but in Maharashtra, they bring Gowri home on the fifth day and then perform the vissarjan on the next day.
      Regards,
      Narayan

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