Not just a Jig on the Rolling Hills of the South


Update for 8 February 2010

The hero pops the question, the heroine shies away – the camera focuses on the perplexed hero’s face looking into the distance – and then the violins string into a melody as the viewer is transported into the couple’s dream sequence. To the rolling hills in the South – where the hero sports his multicolour (technicolour) sweater and white dancing shoes; while the heroine tries to look her seductive best in a “traditional” outfit with lots of chiffons, thick enough to cover her modesty and thin enough for the male audience to get their titillation. The two dance on the slope of the hill surrounded by dancers in red outfits, similar to the heroine’s except that you can figure out why they are referred to as dance extras – they stay in the background, and don’t look as ravishing as the dishy heroine. The hero starts the duet, and the heroine coyly runs down the slope, amid rolling myriad tidbits – sometimes it is bouncy plastic balls, while sometimes, it is colourful tambourines , daflis, and for producers who perhaps own orchards, they throw in fruits like oranges, apples, lemons – anything that can roll down the hill and at the same time, look good. Plus these must lend themselves well to either the music or the lyrics – so if the heroine’s lips are being eulogized, then you can be sure that rosy red apples will roll down, whereas if the dance song has a good beat, then the daflis fit in snugly. Half-way through the song, Heroine will start her warbling, holding her chiffon head-scarf, chunri, and toss it into the wind, and as viewers see it glide up, she has changed her costume into something natty. She would have also in the meantime, moved up another slope and stamped a few more patches of grass, as her hero runs up the hill. The multiple stanzas that each song is made up of gives enough opportunity for the heroine to change her costumes, vary her looks, add new dance moves into the song while the hero keeps pace with his change in pullovers and hairstyles, adding a moustache at times while trying on new sunglasses, of-course ensuring that his trousers always remain detergent drenched white. And we know that the song is coming to a close, when the hero and heroine hold hands, at times arm over shoulder and start walking straight into the sunset – and this is no ordinary sunset – it is one in the backdrop of the rolling hills of the South.

The D Street Boyz were petrified of the PIGS of Europe – and opened today’s business at D Street by slowly pushing the SENSEX down the slope – to the not green patches. They were a little jittery as they pulled it to level ground, but the mood got sombre close to Europe opening that they dropped the SENSEX 200 points down to 15700 levels. Then as though the duet songs on the hills played, the mood of the D Boyz also improved and they pulled the SENSEX up almost 350 points and just as quickly as it started, the duet ditty concluded as it “walked into the sunset” of the day – keeping the SENSEX flattish to last close – 19 points up at 15935. (For those with sharp eyes and sharper minds,  you would notice that the last update on 5 Feb had the SENSEX ending at 15790 – so how do the maths stack up? Well, D Street was open for 90 minutes on Saturday to test their new systems, and during that “trial period”, the D boyz actually heaved up the SENSEX 125 points up.) Singing on the hills must have been good for the music companies as one of the Telecom companies that Airs music – is actually India’s leading music earner these days…. It is therefore not incidental that this company led the SENSEX.

On your next holiday trip to the South, don’t miss the wonderful Filmy Tour that many local taxis will offer. The rolling Hills of the South are definitely on their itinerary and you will see first hand, how easy or not, it is to be a heroine or a hero dancing on these slopes.

Cheers….

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